Anglo-Saxon Site Gets Revamp

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Anglo-Saxon Site Gets Revamp

It is testament to the culture and sophistication of the first people to call themselves ‘English’. One of Britain’s most important archaeological discoveries has been transformed after a £4million revamp. When the site was excavated, just before the Second World War, some of the most stunning ancient treasures ever discovered in the British Isles were carefully dug from the sandy soil on the coast of East Anglia.

The burial mound of Sutton Hoo in Woodbridge, Suffolk is believed to be the final resting place of 7th century ruler King Raedwald.

A new revamp 80 years to the month after the 1939 excavation has seen a large exhibition hall fitted with new technology.

Visitors are also allowed to roam around the burial grounds to explore the attraction for themselves.

An 88ft-long rusted steel sculpture of the burial ship found at the site stands in a courtyard near the entrance.

Some visitors found the previous burial ground layout as a ‘bit of an anti-climax’ by the time they reached them, according to National Trust expert Mike Hopwood.

The 88ft-long rusted steel sculpture of the burial ship found at the site near Woodbridge in Suffolk now stands in a courtyard near the entrance. Visitors are now free to roam the burial mounds outside of guided tours

 But now the story of the Anglo-Saxons and the famous warrior helmet is told in the exhibition hall with the help of new video screens and voice recordings.

New walks have been created in the scenic grounds with views across the River Deben, visitors are now free to roam the burial mounds outside of guided tours, and a 55ft viewing tower is being constructed.

The transformation of the site also sees the home of the landowner who instigated the digs used to tell the story of how the artefacts were discovered just before the Second World War.

The new exhibition is already open, but will be completed in early September, when a viewing platform that towers above the site is opened. Every English patriot should make a point of visiting this massively important site in the history of England and the English.

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